Cine*Matters

On Sunday Afternoons.

All are welcome! No admission fee. Contributions appreciated.

 

2017 Lineup

ABetterLife A BETTER LIFE

 

A 2011 American drama film directed by Chris Weitz. The screenplay, originally known as The Gardener, was written by Eric Eason based on a story by Roger L. Simon. Demián Bichir was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor.

A gardener in East L.A. struggles to keep his son away from gangs and immigration agents while trying to give his son the opportunities he never had.

 

Viewing in Rockberger Hall, in the Education Building @ UUFBR: :

Sun, January 15th @ 12PM Noon

 HollywoodShufHOLLYWOOD SHUFFLE

 

A 1987 satirical comedy film about the racial stereotypes of African Americans in film and television. The film tracks the attempts of Bobby Taylor to become a successful actor and the mental and external roadblocks he encounters, represented through a series of interspersed vignettes and fantasies. Produced, directed, and co-written by Robert Townsend, the film is semi-autobiographical, reflecting Townsend’s experiences as a black actor when he was told he was not “black enough” for certain roles.

 

Viewing in Rockerberger Hall, in the Education Building @UUFBR

Sun, February 19th @ 12PM Noon

TheGoodLieTHE GOOD LIE

 2014 drama written by Margaret Nagle, and directed by Philippe Falardeau. Filmed in Atlanta, Georgia and South Africa, the film stars Reese Witherspoon, Arnold Oceng, Ger Duany, Emmanuel Jal, Corey Stoll, and Sarah Baker. A group of Sudanese refugees given the chance to resettle in America arrive in Kansas City, Missouri, where their encounter with an employment agency counselor forever changes all of their lives. It was screened in the Special Presentations section of the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival before being released on October 3, 2014. Another major screening was held by the Greenwich International Film Festival on October 22, 2014, for the benefit of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

 

Viewing in Rockberger Hall, in the Education Building @ UUFBR:

Sun, March 19th @ 12PM Noon

 DoTheRightThingDO THE RIGHT THING

A 1989 American comedy-drama film produced, written, and directed by Spike Lee, who also played the part of Mookie in the film. Other members of the cast include Danny Aiello, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Richard Edson, Giancarlo Esposito, Bill Nunn, John Turturro, and Samuel L. Jackson. It is also notably the feature film debut of both Martin Lawrence and Rosie Perez. The movie tells the story of a Brooklyn neighborhood’s simmering racial tension, which comes to a head and culminates in tragedy on the hottest day of summer.

The film was a critical and commercial success and received numerous accolades and awards, including an Academy Award nomination for Lee for Best Original Screenplay and one for Best Supporting Actor for Aiello’s portrayal of Sal the pizzeria owner. It is often listed among the greatest films of all time. The film also ranks #403 on Empire magazine’s 2008 list of the 500 greatest movies of all time. In 1999, it was deemed to be “culturally significant” by the U.S. Library of Congress, and was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry, one of just six films to have this honor in their first year of eligibility.

Viewing in Rockberger Hall, in the Education Building @ UUFBR:

Sun, May 21st @ 12PM Noon

2016 Lineup

darkgirls1 DARK GIRLS

 

A 2012 documentary film by American filmmakers Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry. It documents colorism based on skin tone among African Americans, a subject still considered taboo by many black Americans. The film contains interviews with notable African Americans including Viola Davis. It also reports on a new version of the 1940s black doll experiment by Kenneth and Mamie Clark, which proved that black children had internalized racism by having children select a white or a black doll (they typically chose white) based on questions asked. In the updated version, black children favored light-skinned dolls over dark-skinned dolls.

 

VIEWINGS in Rockberger Hall @ UUFBR: :

Sun, December 18th @ 12PM Noon

JANUARY

A Better Life

A 2011 American drama film directed by Chris Weitz. The screenplay, originally known as The Gardener, was written by Eric Eason based on a story by Roger L. Simon. Demián Bichir was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor.


FEBRUARY

Hollywood Shuffle & BET Awards, Jesse Williams

A 1987 satirical comedy film about the racial stereotypes of African Americans in film and television. The film tracks the attempts of Bobby Taylor to become a successful actor and the mental and external roadblocks he encounters, represented through a series of interspersed vignettes and fantasies. Produced, directed, and co-written by Robert Townsend, the film is semi-autobiographical, reflecting Townsend’s experiences as a black actor when he was told he was not “black enough” for certain roles.


MARCH

The Good Lie

 A 2014 drama written by Margaret Nagle, and directed by Philippe Falardeau. Filmed in Atlanta, Georgia and South Africa, the film stars Reese Witherspoon, Arnold Oceng, Ger Duany, Emmanuel Jal, Corey Stoll, and Sarah Baker. A group of Sudanese refugees given the chance to resettle in America arrive in Kansas City, Missouri, where their encounter with an employment agency counselor forever changes all of their lives. It was screened in the Special Presentations section of the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival before being released on October 3, 2014. Another major screening was held by the Greenwich International Film Festival on October 22, 2014, for the benefit of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.


APRIL

Do The Right Thing

A 1989 American comedy-drama film produced, written, and directed by Spike Lee, who also played the part of Mookie in the film. Other members of the cast include Danny Aiello, Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Richard Edson, Giancarlo Esposito, Bill Nunn, John Turturro, and Samuel L. Jackson. It is also notably the feature film debut of both Martin Lawrence and Rosie Perez. The movie tells the story of a Brooklyn neighborhood’s simmering racial tension, which comes to a head and culminates in tragedy on the hottest day of summer.

The film was a critical and commercial success and received numerous accolades and awards, including an Academy Award nomination for Lee for Best Original Screenplay and one for Best Supporting Actor for Aiello’s portrayal of Sal the pizzeria owner. It is often listed among the greatest films of all time. The film also ranks #403 on Empire magazine’s 2008 list of the 500 greatest movies of all time. In 1999, it was deemed to be “culturally significant” by the U.S. Library of Congress, and was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry, one of just six films to have this honor in their first year of eligibility.


MAY

iThemba

A feature-length documentary film shot in Zimbabwe, directed and produced by Elinor Burkett and produced by Errol Webber, who also shot and edited the film. It premiered at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam in November 2010.

The film follows the members of the Zimbabwean band Liyana, a group of eight musicians with physical disabilities who navigate a country where many of their neighbors consider them to be cursed. The funny and talented young people take viewers with them as they travel across the city of Bulawayo and into remote villages, to rural bottle shops and urban marketplaces, inside the huts of traditional healers and the neighborhoods of the urban poor – into an Africa rarely seen by outsiders, a place where tradition is not necessarily gentle, where it threatens to trap the unfortunate, and where a few fight back.

Meet Marvelous Mbulo, the lady-killing lead singer, whose wit provides the film’s heart. Listen to Prudence Mabhena, Liyana’s musical heart. And travel Zimbabwe with the wise-cracking Energy Maburutse, whose humor belies the seriousness of his situation.

The film is filled with an endless flow of the band’s jokes and satire and their amazing Afro-fusion melodies, most composed by members of Liyana.

Shot during and in the wake of the Zimbabwean presidential election, 2008 and the country’s economic meltdown by an American, Zimbabwean and Jamaican team, the film unfolds against the backdrop of enormous political tension and the daily struggle to find a bank that actually had cash, to buy food although the store shelves were empty, and to navigate streets pocked with wheelchair-mangling potholes.


JUNE

Crash

A 2004 drama film co-written, produced, and directed by Paul Haggis. The film is about racial and social tensions in Los Angeles, California. A self-described “passion piece” for Haggis, Crash was inspired by a real-life incident, in which his Porsche was carjacked outside a video store on Wilshire Boulevard in 1991.

Several characters’ stories interweave during two days in Los Angeles: a black detective estranged from his mother; his criminal younger brother and gang associate; the white district attorney and his irritated, pampered wife; a racist white police officer who disgusts his more idealistic younger partner; an African American Hollywood director and his wife who must deal with the officer; a Persian-immigrant father who is wary of others; and a hard-working Hispanic family man, a locksmith. The film differs from many other films about racism in its rather impartial approach to the issue. Rather than separating the characters into victims and offenders, victims of racism are often shown to be prejudiced themselves in different contexts and situations. Also, racist remarks and actions are often shown to stem from ignorance and misconception rather than a malicious personality.

The film features an ensemble cast consisting of Sandra Bullock, Don Cheadle, Matt Dillon, Jennifer Esposito, Brendan Fraser, Terrence Howard, Chris “Ludacris” Bridges, Thandie Newton, Michael Peña, and Ryan Phillippe. Matt Dillon was particularly praised for his performance and received Academy Award, BAFTA, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award nominations for Best Supporting Actor. Additionally, the cast won the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture. The film received six Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director for Paul Haggis, and won three for Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Film Editing at the 78th Academy Awards. It was also nominated for nine BAFTA awards, and won two, for Best Original Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress for Thandie Newton.


JULY

Rabbit Proof Fence

A 2002 Australian drama film directed by Phillip Noyce based on the book Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence by Doris Pilkington Garimara. It is loosely based on a true story concerning the author’s mother Molly, as well as two other mixed-race Aboriginal girls, who ran away from the Moore River Native Settlement, north of Perth, Western Australia, to return to their Aboriginal families, after being placed there in 1931. The film follows the Aboriginal girls as they walk for nine weeks along 1,500 miles (2,400 km) of the Australian rabbit-proof fence to return to their community at Jigalong, while being pursued by white law enforcement authorities and an Aboriginal tracker.

The soundtrack to the film, called Long Walk Home: Music from the Rabbit-Proof Fence, is by Peter Gabriel. British producer Jeremy Thomas, who has a long connection with Australia, was executive producer of the film, selling it internationally through his sales arm, HanWay Films.

 AMREEKAAmeerka

 

A 2009 independent film written and directed by first-time director Cherien Dabis. It stars Nisreen Faour, Melkar Muallem, Hiam Abbass, Alia Shawkat, Yussuf Abu-Warda, Joseph Ziegler, and Miriam Smith.

Amreeka documents the lives of a Palestinian American family in both the West Bank and Post-9/11 suburban Chicago. It premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and opened to critical praise at a number of other important venues. National Geographic Entertainment bought all theatrical and home entertainment rights to Amreeka after its debut at Sundance.

VIEWINGS in Rockberger Hall @ UUFBR:

Tues, September 13th @ 7:00PM 

Sun, September 18th @ 12PM Noon

 DEAR WHITE PEOPLE

 

A 2014 American satirical drama film, written, directed, and co-produced by Justin Simien. The film focuses on escalating racial tensions at a prestigious Ivy League college from the perspective of several African American students. It stars Tyler James Williams, Tessa Thompson, Teyonah Parris, Brandon P Bell, Kyle Gallner, Brittany Curran, Marque Richardson, and Dennis Haysbert.

The film premiered in competition in the US Dramatic Category at 2014 Sundance Film Festival on January 18, 2014. The film had a theatrical release in United States on October 17, 2014.

VIEWINGS in Rockberger Hall @ UUFBR: :

Tues, October 11th @ 7:00PM

Sun, October 16th @ 12PM Noon

 AMERICAN EAST

 

A 2008 American drama film about Arab-Americans living in Los Angeles after the September 11th attacks. The story examines long-held misunderstandings about Arabic and Islamic culture, and puts a human face on a segment of the American population about whom most Americans know nothing, but who today are of particular interest to them, either from curiosity or suspicion. The story highlights the pressures under which many Arab-Americans now live by focusing on the points-of-view of three main characters.

 

VIEWINGS in Rockberger Hall @ UUFBR: :

Tues, November 8th @ 7:00PM (CANCELLED DUE TO ELECTION – VOTE!)

Sun, November 20th @ 12PM Noon

Movies are the most powerful empathy machine in all the arts. When I go to a great movie I can live somebody else’s life for a while. I can walk in somebody else’s shoes. I can see what it feels like to be a member of a different gender, a different race, a different economic class, to live in a different time, to have a different belief ! ! !

~Roger Ebert

Presented by the UUFBR Healing Justice Group